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Below are the 10 most recent journal entries recorded in manual_kunt's LiveJournal:

Monday, January 15th, 2007
12:29 am
A quiz more balanced
Answers in a week or so...

-----

Q.1. Harvey and Bob had gone to watch Truffaut's Les Quatre Cent Coups anticipating it to be a raunchy French affair, but it turned out to be an antithesis of their expectations. Nonetheless, they were so moved by the film that, after some years, they founded their own film-production and distribution company, which they named after their parents (btw, their mother's name was Miriam). This production was later acquired by the Walt Disney Company. Amongst this company's breakthrough films as distributors are  The Crying Game, sex, lies, and videotape, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! and Scandal. It also made film such as Pulp Fiction and Shakespeare In Love before being acquired by Walt Disney. What's this company?

Q.2 Identify the publication house from the logo. It's world's largest publisher of medical and scientific literature with leading products being: journals such as The Lancet, Cell and Tetrahedron Letters, books such Gray's Anatomy and the ScienceDirect collection of electronic journals.

Q.3. This question surrounds one of the finest novels of the 20th century. The novel in question had such a controversial theme that none of the publishers was ready to take it. Finally, a publisher of "erotica" in Paris named Olympia Press came to author's rescue and it was published on Spet 15th, 1955. A favorable notice by Graham Greene led to widespread critical admiration for the book, and eventually it was published in U.S. on August 18, 1958, by G.P. Putnam's Sons. What's this novel?

Q.4. Etymology time. I'll quote from m-w (it's not verbatim though):

Some 700 years ago, in medieval Europe, a bell rang every evening at a fixed hour, and townspeople were required by law to cover or extinguish their hearth fires. It was the "cover fire" bell, or, as the French called it, "coverfeu" (from their verb meaning "to cover" and their word for "fire") from which we get this English word. By the time the word appeared in English the authorities no longer regulated hearth fires, but an evening bell continued to be rung for various purposes — whether to signal the close of day, an evening burial, or enforcement of some other evening regulation. This "bell ringing at evening" became the first English sense of the word in question.

What's the good word?

Q.5 This intellectual secret society at Cambridge University, founded in 1820 by George Tomlinson. The society takes its name from the idea that its members are supposedly the 12 cleverest students at Cambridge. The active membership consists largely of undergraduates, though there have been graduate student members. The society traditionally centered around King's College and Trinity College, though this is no longer the case. This society came to public attention following the exposure of the Cambridge spy ring in 1951. Its former members includes names like Arthur Hallam, Alfred Tennyson, Bertie Russell, E.M. Forster, G.H. Hardy, A.N. Whitehead, Wittgenstein et cetera. What's the name of this society?

Q.6. This hard-rock singer changed his name to something, which was originally the name of his band, for a successful solo career. He is often referred to as the founder of shock rock due to his gory, theatrical performances. His music influenced many later musicians and helped shape the sound of punk rock and early heavy metal. Amongst his fans was Salvador Dalí, who on attending a show in 1973 described it as surreal, and made a hologram called First Cylindric Chromo-Hologram Portrait of [singer's] Brain. Music apart, he is an avid golfer and has participated in several Pro-Am competitions. Who is he?

Q.7. This American novelist from New Orleans, Louisiana, could not get any of his works published during his lifetime. Frustrated with life he committed suicide. After his death his mother brought the manuscript of his now famous work to the attention of the novelist Walker Percy, who ushered the book into print. In 1981 he was posthumously awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Either name the novelist or this Pulitzer winning book.

Q.8. Here's an author talking about his book's title:
I don’t think I have to remind readers what the title means. X don’t exist, except in the speech of old Londoners. The image was a bizarre one, always used for a bizarre thing. “He’s as queer as X,” meant he was queer to the limit of queerness. It did not primarily denote homosexuality, though a queer, before restrictive legislation came in, was a term used for a member of the inverted fraternity.
Europeans who translated the title as Arancia a Orologeria could not understand its Cockney resonance and they assumed that it meant a hand grenade, a cheaper kind of explosive pineapple. I mean it to stand for the application of a mechanistic morality to a living organism oozing with juice and sweetness.
Yes, identify X which is also the title of the book.

Q.9.  This option pricing model posits that a stock price evolves according to geometric Brownian motion and that there is a well defined risk free instrument that pays a constant interest rate. A consequence of this model is a famous formula - which bears the same name as the model and also called Midas formula - which gives the "arbitrage free" value of a call option. The model was introduced by Fischer and Myron in 1973 and was built on earlier insights by Edward Thorpe, Paul Samuelson and Robert C. Merton. Merton and Myron received the 1997 Nobel Prize in Economics for this and related work. Fischer did not receive the prize as he died in 1995.

What is this famous model?

Q.10. Identify the sport ?
Tuesday, November 14th, 2006
11:19 pm
Q.1. Harvey and Bob had gone to watch Truffaut's Les Quatre Cent Coups anticipating it to be a raunchy French affair, but it turned out to be an antithesis of their expectations. Nonetheless, they were so moved by the film that, after some years, they founded their own film-production and distribution company, which they named after their parents (btw, their mother's name was Miriam). This production was later acquired by the Walt Disney Company. Amongst this company's breakthrough films as distributors are  The Crying Game, sex, lies, and videotape, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! and Scandal. It also made film such as Pulp Fiction and Shakespeare In Love before being acquired by Walt Disney. What's this company?

Q.2 Identify the publication house from the logo. It's world's largest publisher of medical and scientific literature with leading products being: journals such as The Lancet, Cell and Tetrahedron Letters, books such Gray's Anatomy and the ScienceDirect collection of electronic journals.

Q.3. This question surrounds one of the finest novels of the 20th century. The novel in question had such a controversial theme that none of the publishers was ready to take it. Finally, a publisher of "erotica" in Paris named Olympia Press came to author's rescue and it was published on Spet 15th, 1955. A favorable notice by Graham Greene led to widespread critical admiration for the book, and eventually it was published in U.S. on August 18, 1958, by G.P. Putnam's Sons. What's this novel?

Q.4. Etymology time. I'll directly quote from m-w:

Some 700 years ago, in medieval Europe, a bell rang every evening at a fixed hour, and townspeople were required by law to cover or extinguish their hearth fires. It was the "cover fire" bell, or, as the French called it, "coverfeu" (from their verb meaning "to cover" and their word for "fire") from which we get this English word. By the time the word appeared in English the authorities no longer regulated hearth fires, but an evening bell continued to be rung for various purposes — whether to signal the close of day, an evening burial, or enforcement of some other evening regulation. This "bell ringing at evening" became the first English sense of the word in question.

What's the good word?

Q.5.
Sunday, January 8th, 2006
8:50 pm
Zero Kelvin: the coolest quiz
A little skewed this quiz is, but I promise the next edition would be more balanced. Shoot back with your answers and comments...

Q.1. This question surrounds one of the greatest modern-day geniuses:

Born in London in 1959, he was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Caltech. He published his first scientific paper at the age of 15, and had received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Caltech by the age of 20. His early scientific work was mainly in high-energy physics, quantum field theory, and cosmology, and included several now-classic results. Having started to use computers in 1973, he rapidly became a leader in the emerging field of scientific computing, and in 1979 he began the construction of SMP--the first modern computer algebra system--which he released commercially in 1981.

Who is he?

Q.2. Identify the character being played by the person in the centre:

        Link

(Partly my ignorance and partly some other factors are to be blamed for the image not appearing here. Please bear with me and follow the link(s))

Q.3.  He is regarded as one of the great geometers of the 20th century. He studied the philosophy of mathematics under Ludwig Wittgenstein but spent most of his life in Canada, where he taught at the University of Toronto. He was most noted for his work on regular polytopes and higher-dimensional geometries. He inspired some of Escher's works, particularly the Circle Limit series (based on hyperbolic tesselations). Also, his works were the source of inspiration behind some of the innovations of Buckminster Fuller.

       Link

Q.4. Get this one: this puzzle was invented in 1974 by the Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture. It comes in four different versions: the 2×2×2, the 3×3×3, the 4×4×4, and the 5×5×5. It has been suggested that the international appeal and export achievement of this puzzle became one of the contributing factors in the reform and liberalization of the Hungarian economy between 1981 and 1985, which finally led to the move from communism to capitalism!
What is this famous puzzle?

Q.5. Now, here is a connection question which some of you might enjoy. Connect the three images:

Hints: Image 1 is of a famous Hollywood director (which brings into contention the definition of famous)
          : Image 2 is the mascot of a not-so-famous operating system
          : Image 3 you better know this one

Q.6 Identify this place

Q.7 Contrary to the popular belief the Normal distribution (or the Bell Curve, or the Gaussian distribution) was not first introduced by Gauss ( another testimonial of Stigler's law of eponymy: "No scientific discovery is named after its original discoverer."), but by a French mathematician in an article titled "The Doctrine of Chances" (1734), in the context of approximating certain binomial distributions for large 'n'. Who'd this Frenchie be?

Q.8 This Indo-British mathematician and logician was born in Madura. His father held various appointments in the service of the East India Company and his mother descended from James Dodson (who computed a table of anti-logarithms). Amongst his other contributions to the field of mathematics he discovered/invented relational algebra, and also has a set of eponymous laws. Who?

Q.9 He was an Austrian-American mathematician and historian of science who became known for his research on the history of astronomy and the other exact sciences in antiquity. By studying clay tablets he discovered that the ancient Babylonians knew much more about mathematics and astronomy than had been realized titherto. He has been called "the most original and productive scholar of the history of the exact sciences ... of our age" (from the N.A.S. biography). In 1931 he founded the mathematical reviewing journal Zentralblatt für Mathematik and in 1939, after the Zentralblatt was taken over by the Nazis, he founded Mathematical Reviews in the U.S.A. to take its place. Who is he?

Q.10 In 1890, Jacob Riis wrote about and photographed the appalling slum conditions in New York City. Around the 1890s, half of New Yorkers lived in slums (similar to modern Bombay) and Riis wrote his book to garner much needed attention. What was the title of the book?
Friday, November 4th, 2005
6:11 pm
Stumbled upon an interesting link on Johanns Vermeer. Especially, check out the 'interactive analysis' of paintings.

http://www.essentialvermeer.com/index.htm
Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005
4:52 pm
Quiz II (mostly mixed bag)

Q1. This song by Roger Waters describes the death of his father, Eric Fletcher Waters, in World War II. The song was written specifically for the 1982 movie version of Pink Floyd's album The Wall and first released as a 7" single on July 26, 1982 before appearing in The Wall film. The song would make its first CD appearance on the 1996 album Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Plays the Music of Pink Floyd. It would be released on CD for the first time, in its original form, on Pink Floyd's 2001 compilation album Echoes. The song also appears on the 2004 re-release of The Final Cut.

The song sets up the story premise for The Wall film by being a composite of the Anzio Campaign where British forces landed on the beaches near Anzio, Italy with the goal of eventually freeing Rome from German control. These forces included C Company of the Royal Fusiliers, of which Eric Waters was therein a member. As Waters tells it, the forward commander had asked to withdraw his forces from a German Tiger tanks assault but the generals refused and the line was held for the cost of a "few hundred ordinary lives". Eventually though the Tigers broke through the British defences and killed most of C Company including Water's father.

In the second verse of the song (which makes up the reprise later in The Wall film), Waters describes how he found the death certificate from the British government among some old photographs, described as a note from King George in the form of a gold leaf scroll. Waters shows his resentment towards the British High Command("Thats how the High Command took my daddy from me!") when the lyrics mention the note had been marked with the King's "rubber stamp". A man lost his life serving his country, yet the British government seemed so indifferent by possibly having some peon of the King stamping the death certificate with the King's mark.

Idenfify the song?

 

Q2. A work of art has been descibed in the following lines:


"Apparently, there was a period when every college dormitory in the country had on its walls a poster of X's ____________; it had become an icon. It is easy to understand its appeal. This is not just an image of big-city loneliness, but of existential loneliness: the sense that we have (perhaps overwhelmingly in late adolescence) of being on our own in the human condition. When we look at that dark New York street, we would expect the fluorescent-lit cafe to be welcoming, but it is not. There is no way to enter it, no door. The extreme brightness means that the people inside are held, exposed and vulnerable. They hunch their shoulders defensively. X did not actually observe them, because he used himself as a model for both the seated men, as if he perceived men in this situation as clones. He modeled the woman, as he did all of his female characters, on his wife. He was a difficult man, and his wife was far more emotionally involved with him than he with her; one of her methods of keeping him with her was to insist that only she would be his model.

"From her diaries we learn that X described this work as a painting of "three characters." The man behind the counter, though imprisoned in the triangle, is in fact free. He has a job, a home, he can come and go; he can look at the customers with a half-smile. It is the customers who are the _________. _________ are predators - but are the men there to prey on the woman, or has she come in to prey on the men? To my mind, the man and woman are a couple, as the position of their hands suggests, but they are a couple so lost in misery that they cannot communicate; they have nothing to give each other. I see the ___________ of the picture not so much as birds of prey, but simply as birds: great winged creatures that should be free in the sky, but instead are shut in, dazed and miserable, with their heads constantly banging against the glass of the world's callousness. In his Last Poems, A. E. Housman (1859-1936) speaks of being "a stranger and afraid/In a world I never made." That was what X felt - and what he conveys so bitterly."

Identify the artist and the work.
 

Q3. Beginning in 1935, a group of mathematicians, mainly French, wrote a series of books presenting an exposition of modern advanced mathematics under a pseudonym. With the goal of founding all of mathematics on set theory, the group strove for utmost rigour and generality, creating some new terminology and concepts along the way. What pseudonym did they choose for the group? 

 

Q4. X was never directly involved with the creation or development of the Internet. He died before the creation of the World Wide Web. Yet many consider him to be the Godfather of our wired age often making reference to his 1945 essay, "As We May Think." In his article, he described a theoretical machine he called a "memex," which was to enhance human memory by allowing the user to store and retrieve documents linked by associations. This associative linking was very similar to what is known today as hypertext. Indeed, Ted Nelson who later did pioneering work with hypertext credited him as his main influence. Others, such as J.C.R. Licklider and Douglas Englebart have also paid homage to him. Who is he?

 

Q5. He was one of the most important mathematicians active in the 20th century and also one of its most extreme scientific personalities, with achievements over a short span of years that are still scarcely credible in their broad scope and sheer bulk, and an approach that antagonised even close followers. He made major contributions to algebraic geometry, homological algebra, and functional analysis. He was awarded the Fields Medal in 1966, and co-awarded the Crafoord Prize with Pierre Deligne in 1988 which he declined on ethical grounds.

He is noted for his mastery of abstract approaches to mathematics, and his perfectionism in matters of formulation and presentation. Relatively little of his work after 1960 was published by the conventional route of the learned journal, circulating initially in duplicated volumes of seminar notes; his influence was to a considerable extent personal, on French mathematics and the Zariski school at Harvard. He is the subject of many stories and some misleading rumours, concerning his work habits and politics, confrontations with other mathematicians and the French authorities, his withdrawal from mathematics at age 40, his retirement and his subsequent lengthy writings.

In 1991, he left his home and disappeared. He is said to now live in the South of France and to entertain no visitors. Various false rumors have him living in Ardèche, herding goats and entertaining radical ecological theories.


Q6. Identify this eccentric mathematician from the anecdote below. Though not the greatest of mathematicians but a very lovable character none the less. He once wrote a postcard to a friend containing the following New Year's resolutions:

1. To prove the Riemann hypothesis, 
2. To make a brilliant play in a crucial cricket match,
3. To prove the nonexistence of God,
4. To be the first man atop Mount Everest,
5. To be proclaimed the first president of the U.S.S.R., Great Britain, and Germany, and
6. To murder Mussolini.
He once told Bertrand Russell "If I could prove by logic that you would die in five minutes, I should be sorry you were going to die, but my sorrow would be very much mitigated by pleasure in the proof ".

 

Q7. This mathematical genius and a German economist, Oskar Morgenstern, laid the foundation of what we know today as game theory and published the classic book Theory of Games and Economic Behavior in 1944 (considerd second only to Keynes's masterpiece: General Theory of Employment Interest and Money). He propounded the concept of "MAD" (mutually assured destruction), which dominated American nuclear strategy in the Cold War. He worked in the Theory division at Los Alamos along with Hans Bethe and Victor Weisskopf during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project to develop the first atomic weapons. Who is he?

 

Q8. He was a student of Arnold Sommerfeld, an assistant to Max Born, and later a close associate of Niels Bohr. He taught at the universities of Leipzig (1927–41) and Berlin (1942–45) and during World War II he headed German efforts in nuclear fission research, which failed to develop a nuclear reactor or atomic bomb. According to an apocryphal story: he was asked what he would ask God, given the opportunity. His reply was: " When I meet God, I am going to ask him two questions: Why relativity? And why turbulence? I really believe he will have an answer for the first."

I'm sure you have heard his name. Who?

 

Q9.  This lady (1718 - 1799)...ahem...was an Italian linguist, mathematician, and philosopher. She was born to a literate and wealty family and was the oldest of 21 children in her family. Her father was a professor of mathematics and provided her a profound education. She was recognized as a child prodigy very early; spoke French by the age of five; and had mastered Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and several modern languages by the age of nine and had mastered mathematics in her teens. In 1738 she published a collection of complex essays on natural science and philosophy called Propositiones Philosophicae, based on her discussions with intellectuals of the day. She is credited with writing the first book discussing both differential and integral calculus (Analytical Institutions).

There is a very famous curve in mathematics associated with this lady and its history too is pretty interesting: it was originally studied by Fermat and was called a versiera, a word derived from the Latin vertere, meaning 'to turn', but it was also an abbreviation for the Italian word avversiera, meaning 'the wife of the devil'. However, when this lady's text was translated into English the word versiera was confused with "witch". Lots of hints there, who is she?

 

Q10.  The origin of the name of the city is said to come from the appearance of the planet Mars during the foundation of the city. The planet Mars, associated with destruction was called "Al Najm Al Qahir" in Arabic, from which the name of the city was derived. However the legacy of the name evolved into the title "Qahirat Al Adaa" meaning "subduer of the enemies". This title was given to the city as many armies were destroyed in attempts to invade it. Now-a-days its called Al-Qahirah which literally means "The Subduer," though it is often translated as "The Victorious." Which city is being talked about?

Friday, October 28th, 2005
6:42 pm
Quiz II

Marie, Marie, hold on tight,

Here's another quiz, take a bite.

 

 

Friday, October 21st, 2005
6:57 pm
answers and scores!

Response to the quiz was overwhelmingly overwhelming. Here are the answers and scores...and thanks all for the words of appreciation. Hope everyone enjoyed the quiz.

 

Q1. Idenftify the actor

    Actor - filmography

  1. Once Upon a Horse... (1958) .... Ben
    ... aka Hot Horse (USA: reissue title)
  2. Utah Blaine (1957) .... Gus Ortmann
  3. The Harder They Fall (1956) .... Buddy Brannen
  4. Rootin' Tootin' Tenderfeet (1952) .... Max
  5. The Champ Steps Out (1951)
  6. Skipalong Rosenbloom (1951) .... Butcher Baer
    ... aka Square Shooter (USA: reissue title)
  7. Wine, Women and Bong (1951)
  8. Two Roaming Champs (1950)
  9. Riding High (1950) (uncredited) .... Bertie
  10. Bride for Sale (1949) .... Litka
  11. Africa Screams (1949) .... Grappler McCoy
    ... aka Abbott and Costello in Africa
  12. Two Knights from Brooklyn (1949) .... Mr. Samson
  13. Buckskin Frontier (1943) .... Tiny
    ... aka The Iron Road (UK)
  14. Ladies' Day (1943) .... Hippo Jones
  15. The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942) .... Professor Samson
    ... aka Two Mugs from Brooklyn (USA: new title)
  16. The Navy Comes Through (1942) .... Coxswain G. Berringer
  17. Over She Goes (1938) .... Silas Morner
  18. Kids On the Cuff (1935)
  19. The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933) .... Steve Morgan
    ... aka Every Woman's Man

Answer: Max Baer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Baer (lost his heavy weight title to Jimmy Braddock)

Q2. He is considered as one of the two foremost mathematicians who were active at the turn of the 20th century (the other being David Hilbert). He has been called the last universalist--one who was at ease in all branches of mathematics, both pure and applied. In addition to advancing numerous branches of mathematics he contributed to the theories of celestial mechanics and electromagnetism and to the philosophy of science (about which he wrote several widely read popular books; youthful Albert Einstein was greatly impressed by one of these). Along with these highly theoretical pursuits, he served as an engineer inspecting coal mines. He rose to be Inspector General of the Corps des Mines and the president of the French Bureau of Longitude, where he oversaw the precision mapping of the globe using the new techniques of time synchronization by undersea cables and telegraphy. He independently discovered several key aspects of relativity before and concurrent with Einstein. In 1904, one year before Einstein published his landmark paper on relativity, he spoke prophetically at an international conference, "Perhaps we must construct a new mechanics, of which we can only catch a glimpse,... in which the velocity of light would become an impassable limit."

Answer: Jules Henri Poincaré lifted this one off Scientific American

 

Q3. Time for the sitter:

In 1963, when I assigned the name "quark" to the fundamental constituents of the nucleon, I had the sound first, without the spelling, which could have been "kwork." Then, in one of my occasional perusals of Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce, I came across the word "quark" in the phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark." Since "quark" (meaning, for one thing, the cry of a gull) was clearly intended to rhyme with "Mark," as well as "bark" and other such words, I had to find an excuse to pronounce it as "kwork." But the book represents the dreams of a publican named Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker. Words in the text are typically drawn from several sources at once, like the "portmanteau words" in Through the Looking Glass. From time to time, phrases occur in the book that are partially determined by calls for drinks at the bar. I argued, therefore, that perhaps one of the multiple sources of the cry "Three quarks for Muster Mark" might be "Three quarts for Mister Mark," in which case the pronunciation "kwork" would not be totally unjustified. In any case, the number three fitted perfectly the way quarks occur in nature. who is I here ?

Answer: Feynmann's right-hand man Murray Gell Mann...popularly known as the man with five brains

Q4. He is considered to be one of the founding fathers of the American school of theoretical physics, and developed a reputation for his eclecticism, his interest in languages and Eastern philosophy, and the eloquence and clarity with which he thought. But he was also troubled throughout his life, and professed to experiencing periods of depression. In 1962, General Leslie Groves wrote to him, asking if he had chosen name "_____" [for some purpose] on the basis that it was a common name to rivers and peaks in the West and would not attract attention. He wrote back saying: "I did suggest it, but not on [that] ground... Why I chose the name is not clear, but I know what thoughts were in my mind. There is a poem of John Donne, written just before his death, which I know and love. From it a quotation: 'As West and East / In all flatt Maps—and I am one—are on, / So death doth touch the Resurrection.That still does not make a Trinity, but in another, better known devotional poem Donne opens, 'Batter my heart, three person'd God;—.' Beyond this, I have no clues whatever." who is this guy and what is being discussed between General Leslie and him ?

Answer: Robert Oppenheimer and Trinity test (first nuclear test)

Q5.  He is regarded as the second most prolific mathematician (wrote around 1500 mathematical articles in his lifetime), second only to Euler. He once famously said "A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems ", and he drank plenty of it. He had his own idiosyncratic vocabulary: he spoke of "the Book", an imaginary book in which God had written down the best and most elegant proofs for mathematical theorems (although he was an atheist and playfully referred to God as the "Supreme Fascist"). He referred to children as as "epsilons"; women as "bosses"; men as "slaves"; alcoholic drinks as "poison"; music as "noise"; U.S. was "samland", the Soviet Union was "joedom" (after Joseph Stalin), and Israel was "isreal". For his epitaph he suggested the saying "Finally I am becoming stupider no more ". Who is this eccentric genius ?

Answer: Paul Erdos

 

Q6. This term  was coined by Gertrude Stein to refer to a group of American literati who lived in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s. Significant members included Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sherwood Anderson, Waldo Peirce, Sylvia Beach, and Gertrude Stein herself. Whats the term?

Asnwers: The Lost Generation

 

Q7. How could a quiz be complete without an etymology question. This nonsense word coined by British actor and playwright Samuel Foote around 1755. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, Foote made up a line of gibberish to "test the memory of his fellow actor Charles Macklin, who had asserted that he could repeat anything after hearing it once." Foote's made-up line was, "And there were present the Picninnies, and the Joblillies, and the Garyulies and the Grand _________ himself, with the little round button at the top." Some 75 years after this, Foote's passage appeared in a book of stories for children by the Anglo-Irish writer Maria Edgeworth. It took another quarter century before English speakers actually incorporated "_________" into their general vocabulary. Whats the word in question?

Asnwer: Panjandrum

 

Q8. Where would one find these words:

Not only the title, but the plan and a good deal of the

incidental symbolism of the poem were suggested

by Miss Jessie L. Weston's book on the Grail legend:

From Ritual to Romance. Indeed, so deeply am I indebted,

Miss Weston's book will elucidate the difficulties of the poem much better than my notes can do;

and I recommend it (apart from the great interest of the book itself)

to any who think such elucidation of the poem worth the trouble.

To another work of anthropology I am indebted in general, one which has

influenced our generation profoundly; I mean The Golden Bough; I have

used especially the two volumes Adonis, Attis, Osiris.  Anyone who is

acquainted with these works will immediately recognise in the poem

certain references to vegetation ceremonies.

 

Answer: these words can be found in The Waste Land...actually in the notes to the poem

Q9. What according to Soren Kierkegaard was the greatest work of art ever made?

Answer: Mozart's Don Giovanni

Q10. The _______Prize is an annual prize awarded by the Praemium _______Foundation, a Dutch non-profit organization, to individuals or institutions that have made notable contributions to European culture, society, or social science. The Praemium ________Foundation was founded on 23 June 1958 by Prince Bernhard. The amount of the prize is €150,000. Its past recipients include Marc Chagall, Charlie Chaplin, Simon Weisenthall, Claude-Levi Stauss, Amnesty International, Ingmar Bergman, to name a few.

Answer: the Erasmus Prize

Scores:

 

Shakuni 3

Oldhen 3

Halfbrain 8

Davenchit 6

Madhav 1

Mrsgollum 3

Suchetana 10

Quizling 4

 

 

 

 

 



Current Mood: awake
Saturday, October 15th, 2005
1:34 pm
Quiz!Quiz!

Darn 'em googlers - Schopenhauer

answers in a week or so.

Q1. Idenftify the actor

    Actor - filmography

  1. Once Upon a Horse... (1958) .... Ben
    ... aka Hot Horse (USA: reissue title)
  2. Utah Blaine (1957) .... Gus Ortmann
  3. The Harder They Fall (1956) .... Buddy Brannen
  4. Rootin' Tootin' Tenderfeet (1952) .... Max
  5. The Champ Steps Out (1951)
  6. Skipalong Rosenbloom (1951) .... Butcher Baer
    ... aka Square Shooter (USA: reissue title)
  7. Wine, Women and Bong (1951)
  8. Two Roaming Champs (1950)
  9. Riding High (1950) (uncredited) .... Bertie
  10. Bride for Sale (1949) .... Litka
  11. Africa Screams (1949) .... Grappler McCoy
    ... aka Abbott and Costello in Africa
  12. Two Knights from Brooklyn (1949) .... Mr. Samson
  13. Buckskin Frontier (1943) .... Tiny
    ... aka The Iron Road (UK)
  14. Ladies' Day (1943) .... Hippo Jones
  15. The McGuerins from Brooklyn (1942) .... Professor Samson
    ... aka Two Mugs from Brooklyn (USA: new title)
  16. The Navy Comes Through (1942) .... Coxswain G. Berringer
  17. Over She Goes (1938) .... Silas Morner
  18. Kids On the Cuff (1935)
  19. The Prizefighter and the Lady (1933) .... Steve Morgan
    ... aka Every Woman's Man

Q2. He is considered as one of the two foremost mathematicians who were active at the turn of the 20th century (the other being David Hilbert). He has been called the last universalist--one who was at ease in all branches of mathematics, both pure and applied. In addition to advancing numerous branches of mathematics he contributed to the theories of celestial mechanics and electromagnetism and to the philosophy of science (about which he wrote several widely read popular books; youthful Albert Einstein was greatly impressed by one of these). Along with these highly theoretical pursuits, he served as an engineer inspecting coal mines. He rose to be Inspector General of the Corps des Mines and the president of the French Bureau of Longitude, where he oversaw the precision mapping of the globe using the new techniques of time synchronization by undersea cables and telegraphy. He independently discovered several key aspects of relativity before and concurrent with Einstein. In 1904, one year before Einstein published his landmark paper on relativity, he spoke prophetically at an international conference, "Perhaps we must construct a new mechanics, of which we can only catch a glimpse,... in which the velocity of light would become an impassable limit."

Q3. Time for the sitter:

In 1963, when I assigned the name "quark" to the fundamental constituents of the nucleon, I had the sound first, without the spelling, which could have been "kwork." Then, in one of my occasional perusals of Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce, I came across the word "quark" in the phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark." Since "quark" (meaning, for one thing, the cry of a gull) was clearly intended to rhyme with "Mark," as well as "bark" and other such words, I had to find an excuse to pronounce it as "kwork." But the book represents the dreams of a publican named Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker. Words in the text are typically drawn from several sources at once, like the "portmanteau words" in Through the Looking Glass. From time to time, phrases occur in the book that are partially determined by calls for drinks at the bar. I argued, therefore, that perhaps one of the multiple sources of the cry "Three quarks for Muster Mark" might be "Three quarts for Mister Mark," in which case the pronunciation "kwork" would not be totally unjustified. In any case, the number three fitted perfectly the way quarks occur in nature. who is I here ?

Q4. He is considered to be one of the founding fathers of the American school of theoretical physics, and developed a reputation for his eclecticism, his interest in languages and Eastern philosophy, and the eloquence and clarity with which he thought. But he was also troubled throughout his life, and professed to experiencing periods of depression. In 1962, General Leslie Groves wrote to him, asking if he had chosen name "_____" [for some purpose] on the basis that it was a common name to rivers and peaks in the West and would not attract attention. He wrote back saying: "I did suggest it, but not on [that] ground... Why I chose the name is not clear, but I know what thoughts were in my mind. There is a poem of John Donne, written just before his death, which I know and love. From it a quotation: 'As West and East / In all flatt Maps—and I am one—are on, / So death doth touch the Resurrection.That still does not make a Trinity, but in another, better known devotional poem Donne opens, 'Batter my heart, three person'd God;—.' Beyond this, I have no clues whatever." who is this guy and what is being discussed between General Leslie and him ?

Q5.  He is regarded as the second most prolific mathematician (wrote around 1500 mathematical articles in his lifetime), second only to Euler. He once famously said "A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems ", and he drank plenty of it. He had his own idiosyncratic vocabulary: he spoke of "the Book", an imaginary book in which God had written down the best and most elegant proofs for mathematical theorems (although he was an atheist and playfully referred to God as the "Supreme Fascist"). He referred to children as as "epsilons"; women as "bosses"; men as "slaves"; alcoholic drinks as "poison"; music as "noise"; U.S. was "samland", the Soviet Union was "joedom" (after Joseph Stalin), and Israel was "isreal". For his epitaph he suggested the saying "Finally I am becoming stupider no more ". Who is this eccentric genius ?

Q6. This term  was coined by Gertrude Stein to refer to a group of American literati who lived in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s. Significant members included Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sherwood Anderson, Waldo Peirce, Sylvia Beach, and Gertrude Stein herself. Whats the term?

Q7. How could a quiz be complete without an etymology question. This nonsense word coined by British actor and playwright Samuel Foote around 1755. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, Foote made up a line of gibberish to "test the memory of his fellow actor Charles Macklin, who had asserted that he could repeat anything after hearing it once." Foote's made-up line was, "And there were present the Picninnies, and the Joblillies, and the Garyulies and the Grand _________ himself, with the little round button at the top." Some 75 years after this, Foote's passage appeared in a book of stories for children by the Anglo-Irish writer Maria Edgeworth. It took another quarter century before English speakers actually incorporated "_________" into their general vocabulary. Whats the word in question?

Q8. Where would one find these words:

Not only the title, but the plan and a good deal of the

incidental symbolism of the poem were suggested

by Miss Jessie L. Weston's book on the Grail legend:

From Ritual to Romance. Indeed, so deeply am I indebted,

Miss Weston's book will elucidate the difficulties of the poem much better than my notes can do;

and I recommend it (apart from the great interest of the book itself)

to any who think such elucidation of the poem worth the trouble.

To another work of anthropology I am indebted in general, one which has

influenced our generation profoundly; I mean The Golden Bough; I have

used especially the two volumes Adonis, Attis, Osiris.  Anyone who is

acquainted with these works will immediately recognise in the poem

certain references to vegetation ceremonies.

Q9. What according to Soren Kierkegaard was the greatest work of art ever made?

Q10. The _______Prize is an annual prize awarded by the Praemium _______Foundation, a Dutch non-profit organization, to individuals or institutions that have made notable contributions to European culture, society, or social science. The Praemium ________Foundation was founded on 23 June 1958 by Prince Bernhard. The amount of the prize is €150,000. Its past recipients include Marc Chagall, Charlie Chaplin, Simon Weisenthall, Claude-Levi Stauss, Amnesty International, Ingmar Bergman, to name a few.



Current Mood: accomplished
Monday, August 22nd, 2005
2:45 pm
Saturday, August 20th, 2005
1:47 pm
deeper meaning of liff [appendix]
missnomer: a girl whose name belies her looks

laugerhead: someone who doesnt know whether the first runner-up, in a competiton, is the one who comes second or third and has similar doubts about the standing of the second runner-up

iamfked: you are all drunk and you inadvertently step into ladies' bathroom only to find your boss's newly married wife

...TO BE APPENDED, soon

Current Mood: katzemjammered
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